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16% of Americans Rely on Their Hair Stylist to Learn More about Beauty

by | 5 minute read

“According to a recent online survey conducted by Ipsos on behalf of Allergan, which interviewed adults who are open to going to a professional to improve their appearance, 92% say that looking their best is important for daily activities (e.g career, school, volunteering, errands) and most further believe that the way they look (84%) and the way their body looks (81%) contribute to how successful they can be in all aspects of their lives. Nearly nine in ten also say that looking fit and healthy, and being on trend with fashion and beauty contributes to their confidence (86%).”

  • Younger adults (ages 21-35) are particularly likely to agree that looking their best is important for daily activities (93% vs. 89% of those age 56-65), that the way they look (90% vs. 78%)/the way their body looks (88% vs. 72%) contributes to their personal success in life, and that looking fit and healthy, and being on trend with fashion and beauty contributes to their confidence (89% vs. 82%).
  • Men are also much more likely to believe that the way their body looks contributes to how successful they are in all aspects of their lives compared to women (88% vs. 78%, respectively).”

“Nearly all ‘aesthetic conscious’ adults surveyed strongly agree/agree/slightly agree that they care about the way their face looks (99%) and want their face to look good at any age (98%). Just over eight in ten (83%) also say it is important to them that others find their face attractive, with men (86% vs. 82%) and young adults (89% of those age 21-35 vs. 75% of those age 56+) particularly likely to emphasize the importance of others finding their face attractive.”

“Thinking about face perceptions, seven in ten say that they are satisfied with their facial appearance (71%) and feel as though their face matches the way the feel inside (70%). Nevertheless, two thirds (65%) report being self-conscious about a specific facial feature and most also agree that they are interested in what options exist to address their facial concerns (79%).

  • While men and younger adults are more likely to be satisfied with their facial appearance and feel as though their face reflects what they feel on the inside, they are also more likely to report being self-conscious about a specific facial feature.
  • Women, on the other hand, stand out as being more likely to express interest in what options exist to address their facial concerns (81% vs. 76% of men), along with younger adults. Women (90% vs. 86% of men) and both young (90% of those age 21-35) and middle-aged adults (91% of those age 36-55 vs. 85% of those age 56+) are also particularly likely to consider it worthwhile to spend money to improve the way their face looks.”

“Body aging does not bother nearly two in five (39%), particularly men (55% vs. 33% of women) and younger adults (46% of those age 21-35 vs. 37% of those age 56+). However, when it comes to aging, 85% would consider non-surgical intervention to prevent/reverse the signs of aging.”

“Respondents in the U.S. are more likely to say that they modify or avoid social interactions specifically due to the appearance of their body (40%), than they are to do this due to the appearance of their face (32%). Three in ten report that they always use apps to modify or erase something on their body (28%) or face (28%) before posting a photo on social media.”

“When it comes to defining attractiveness, respondents are most likely to base their ideal definition of attractive on sources such as their friends (48%), family (43%), and TV/movie stars (42%). Three in ten define attractiveness by looking at models (31%), athletes (31%), magazines (31%), and ancestry/culture (30%), while fewer base their definition of aesthetic appeal on social media personalities/influencers (22%), musicians (14%) or other public figures (8%).”

“Aspects that are concerning to respondents are facial lines or wrinkles on the forehead (46%), fat/fullness under chin (44%), facial lines or wrinkles around lower face (44%), facial skin issues such as acne or redness (40%), stubborn fat in double chin (39%) and receding hairline/thinning hair/pattern baldness (38%).”

Many of these concerns can be aided by a talented hair stylist. According to AudienceSCAN, 41.3% of Potential Hair Stylist Switchers want to make purchases that make them feel more attractive, and having a fashionable hairstyle can help consumers look like their favorite movie stars and hide imperfections such as forehead wrinkles, acne and balding. A nicely kept beard can also disguise signs of weight gain for men. When deciding what service to go with to fix their insecurities, 59.7% of Hair Stylist Switchers have used a search engine to do their research within the last month. Additionally, within the last six months, 64.9% have watched online or streamed videos on their mobile devices and are 73% more likely than other adults to find ads on social networks useful. 

“When it comes to information sources about beauty/grooming treatments, roughly one in five ‘aesthetic conscious’ adults say that they turn to TV shows and magazine advertisement (19% both) to learn more – on par with those who say that they turn to TV advertisements (21%) and/their hair stylist, make-up artists or barber (16%). Respondents are more likely to seek out information about beauty/grooming treatments from the internet (38%), friends, family and co-workers (36%), magazine articles (27%), physician, nurses and aestheticians (24%), and social media (23%), while roughly one in ten turn to celebrities (12%) and blogs (11%) to learn more.”

Hair stylists can promote their appearance-enhancing services to Hair Stylist Switchers in many ways. For starters, last year, 73.2% of these consumers took action after seeing a TV commercial, 59.6% were driven to action by both print and digital newspaper ads and 47.9% were influenced by outdoor ads, according to AudienceSCAN. They’re also 52% more likely than other adults to click on text link ads on websites and 86% more likely to find advertising on mobile apps useful. Also within the last year, 60.5% reacted to email ads they received and 56.2% took action after hearing radio ads, both online and over-the-air.

AudienceSCAN data is available for your applications and dashboards through the SalesFuel API. Media companies and agencies can access AudienceSCAN data through the AudienceSCAN Reports in AdMall.

Rachel Cagle

Rachel Cagle

Rachel is a Research Analyst, specializing in audience intelligence, at SalesFuel. She also helps to maintain the major accounts and co-op intelligence databases. As the holder of a Bachelors degree in English from The Ohio State University, Rachel helps the rest of the SalesFuel team with their writing needs.