If it isn’t broken, don’t fix it – that may be the attitude of marketers who feel like their campaigns are working quite well. However, ad agencies don’t agree with this viewpoint and they’re eager to encourage clients to try something new. This disconnect between client and agencies suggests that providers  of new media formats should work hard at convincing advertisers of their merits of their offerings.

Econsultancy and SAS studied this topic and found a significant difference in attitudes about the latest marketing strategies. While 75% of ad agencies believe their clients should increase their mobile marketing budgets in 2011, only 62% of advertisers felt the same way. On the other hand, higher percentages of advertisers than agencies planned to increase spending on well-known digital formats like websites (61%), paid search (51%) and display (49%).  In a similar study published by the Direct Marketing Association, agencies said they were familiar with and used the following  marketing methods at higher rates than advertisers:  Blogging/podcasting, viral marketing, digital out of home marketing, and online interactive gaming.

It’s also intriguing that advertisers believe they can measure ROI from marketing campaigns. And advertisers indicate confidence in their measurement capabilities at a much higher rate than agencies. Here are the percentages of advertisers who say they have a ‘good’ ability to measure ROI. (The corresponding figures for agencies appear in parentheses.)

  • Paid search: 58% (48%)
  • Email marketing: 49% (38%)
  • Corporate website: 43% (17%)
  • Display: 43% (17%)
  • Mobile: 25% (7%)

If agencies intend to convince clients to try new formats like mobile media, one of the first steps might be to show clients accurate methods for measuring ROI.

[Source: Advertiser-Agency Gap in Digital Spending Priorities. Emarketer.com. 11 Mar. 2011. Web. 24 Mar. 2011]