Who knew that in any one year, 16% of consumers switch their PHP (primary healthcare provider)? This statistic provided important insight to the developers of a disruptive technology known as quick health clinics. These clinics, at first disdained by the entrenched medical establishment, have become a fixture at many retail locations across the country in the past few year724912_red_cross_signs.

In preparing to launch their new medical service, MinuteClinic studied behavioral differences between generations as well as their connections with their health care providers. Here’s a summary of the findings:

  • Greatest Generation – This group is brand loyal, trusts institutions, and believes their central contact with the healthcare system is the physician. They are not easily influenced by healthcare marketing.
  • Baby Boomers – This group is accustomed to ‘being pursued’. They appreciate ‘custom’ treatment and they pay attention to ads . Boomers feel the physician is the central contact point but they bring outside information to any physician encounter.
  • Generation X and Millennials– To some extent these groups have not been marketed to as much and they seek out peer information. They also are comfortable being in contact with clinics, labs and hospitals and don’t believe the primary healthcare provider is a gatekeeper to the system.

These findings may explain why the patient age demographics of retail health clinics break out as follows:

  • Age 2-5 12%
  • Ages 6-17 26%
  • Ages 18-44 46%
  • Ages 45-64 16%

These findings don’t necessarily mean that you shouldn’t market to the Boomer generation. Just be sure your marketing convinces them that you can meet their unique needs. Doing so may expand your customer base.

[Source: Customer Experience, A Generational Perspective, The Beryl Institute, 2009]