According to The NPD Group, Inc., the total home textiles market declined 3.5% in dollar sales for the 12 months ending June 2009, versus the same time last year, and has been declining steadily over the past three years. Consumer Spending logo

In spite of all this, the kitchen and dining home textile segment grew 3.7% in dollar sales, compared to the previous 12 months, and was the only segment that showed growth in the 12 months ending June 2009. In fact, the growth in kitchen and dining is the only growth seen among the main textile segments (bed, bath, kitchen & dining, and window) in the past few years.

While the kitchen and dining segment showed growth in most colors and patterns, the color white was the clear winner, increasing 23% in dollar sales, followed by solid light colors, up 16%. Although white represents the most dollar sales across all textile segments, and grew by more than five percent in the bath segment, solid dark colors performed the best in bedding sales.

“The emphasis on white and solid color textiles speaks to a desire for versatility, whether it is coordinating across décor styles, or across seasons,” said Peter Goldman, president of NPD’s home industry sector.

When it comes to purchasing home textiles, consumers told NPD they aren’t necessarily purchasing them for special occasions. Home textile purchases made only for a special occasion were down 14% in dollars in the 12 months ending June 2009, while dollar sales of textile items purchased for everyday or a combination of uses (everyday and special occasion), grew by 12% and 8%, respectively.

The look of the product still ranks at the top in terms of motivators behind consumer home textile purchases, though price and sale/promotion are among the most important as well. Friend or relative recommendation became more important over the past two years, up 16% in the 12 months ending June ’08 and up 7% ending June ’09.

“Although consumers want to get as much use as they can from their home textile purchases, overall style and functionality clearly remains a driving force behind their purchase decisions,” said Goldman.

Research conducted by The NPD Group, October 2, 2009.  Website: www.npd.com.