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Do You Know This Secret to Convincing Prospects to Listen to Your Voice Mail?

by | 2 minute read

These days, prospects are apt to swipe right through your email messages. And, voice mail? Forget it – unless you
give them good reason to listen. Jay Warden, at SalesLoft, knows how to get a prospect to pay attention to your cold-call voice mail. Want to know the secret? Read on.

Intrigue

In a cold-call situation, the prospect has zero reason to want to hear what you’re saying. You’ve interrupted their private world. You’ve intruded. Most people already have too many interruptions in their day-to-day lives. Warden explains you’ve got 30 seconds to intrigue them. This doesn’t mean trying to overload them with details and cram your entire pitch into this short space. You don’t want to play games and create a big mystery around why you’re calling, either. Over time, that kind of intrigue generally aggravates your prospects. Instead, dangle a few details before them. You want them to know that dealing with you will be worth ‘their time and energy.’

Relentless

Warden also encourages you to be relentless. This is not the same as stalking or harassing a prospect. If the person tells you to cease all contact, respect his wishes. But, in many cases, you might not get a response at all to your first few attempts to connect. At the end of each call, close by saying you will be in touch again. Maintain a positive and polite attitude and then follow through. Make contact again by email or voice mail. The prospect then gets the idea that you aren’t going away until he speaks with you.

The bottom line with cold calls is you want to initiate interest not overwhelm a prospect. Give the strategy a try and see if you connect with more sales as a result.

Kathy Crosett
Kathy is the Vice President of Research for SalesFuel. She holds a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Vermont and oversees a staff of researchers, writers and content providers for SalesFuel. Previously, she was co-owner of several small businesses in the health care services sector.