Some 95% of girls aged 15-17 and 88% of girls aged 12-14 wear makeup. Tweens tend to wear brands such as Wet n’ Wild and Mary Kay, whereas teens gravitate towards Maybelline, Revlon, and Neutrogena. Beauty brands attribute the increase in young consumers buying their products to the Internet. “They are really savvy, they do their own research and know exactly what brands and products they need,” says cosmetic brand Korres’ Annia Spahr.

More than half of cosmetic purchases are made at drug stores and an additional third come from Walmart. Those who buy cosmetics at retail have come to expect that all stores – mass, drug, or department – accept returns, says Taylor, adding that it’s a notable shift since flexible return policies were previously a key selling only point at higher-end chains such as Sephora and Nordstrom. “It’s definitely trickled down, but it’s a good thing since it gets women back in the store,” says cosmetic brand Smashbox’s Lori Taylor.

Cool colors are expected to be popular this fall, says many manufacturers. Many companies are introducing “peacock” shades, such as teal, navy, and gold, in lipsticks, eye shadows, and eye liner.

While the majority of brands aren’t age specific, Dermalogica has created its own separate brand, Clean Start, to specifically target tweens and teens. “It’s under the same umbrella but it addresses their unique concerns like oily skin and breakouts,” says the company’s Nathalie Banker. Dermalogica reaches out via social media, the My Beauty mobile bus tour, and via eco-friendly efforts. Consumers, for instance, receive a reusable water bottle with a $35 purchase.  The teen line’s intent is to teach teens how to treat their skin, but will hopefully get them to gravitate to other Dermalogica products – such as anti-aging – when the time comes.

[Source:  “Cosmetic Brands Age Down To Appeal To Tweens, Teens.”  Youth Markets Alert. 1 Aug. 2010.  Web.  5 Aug. 2010. (via:  EPM Communications.  Youth Markets Alert.)]