In my last article, I discussed mobile pay-per-call advertising and how it serves as the perfect complement to a business’s advertising efforts.  Let’s now take a quick look at mobile pay-per-call advertising and how it works behind the scenes. To get started with pay-per-call , you pass your business’s information over to the pay-per-call network and let them know the call duration you require for a quality lead.  The best part is that you only pay once you get a lead.  The setup promises low risk and high returns. Mobile pay-per-call advertising is managed for you and your business.  On the back end, the many moving parts ensure the quality of your campaign.  The pay-per-call network’s delicate orchestration of tracking, affiliate relations, accounting and campaign performance optimization are responsible for turning on your call lead engine. To track call analytics, advertisers use a dedicated dashboard  to view campaign details ranging from geographic location to call duration  to  qualified leads data.  With this data, you can refine your qualification process to get the best results per call lead.  If your call center team becomes savvy enough to qualify a lead within the time you have specified in your pay-per-call campaign setup, then you have the potential to turn each and every call into profit.  From that point, the call volume you receive is contingent upon how many calls the affiliates that drive them can produce.

                                                                                                                                                                      Source: RingRevenue

[This is screenshot of the backend of a Mobile Pay-Per-Call campaign.  There, the business can see statistics about phone number source, call geography, call duration, and more.] Note that the higher call duration you specify , the less likely  affiliates are to promote your company.  The affiliates that drive the phone calls are typically compensated based on call duration and in rare cases, closed sales. If your quality lead requirements are too rigid, and the call durations are too long, affiliates will typically shy away from your offer.  Try and run with the lowest call duration possible for your call center to qualify a lead.  The quicker your operators are at qualifying the incoming leads, the better.  If you  set a low call duration when launching your campaign, you will attract  more affiliates. With mobile pay-per-call marketing, affiliates translate to calls.  For example, if you set  a minimum call duration of 3 minutes and your competition requires 2 minutes for the same payout, affiliates will drive leads to your competitors.

Mobile Pay-Per-Call and the Bottom Line

Several Fortune 500 companies have already transitioned to the pay-per-call model and have seen incredible returns.  Behind the scenes, big players in the auto insurance and finance industries have been reaping the benefits of mobile pay-per-call campaigns.  Still, mobile pay-per-call is a relatively new form of online marketing, and holds more promise than just about any form of advertising today.  Nikesh Aurora, Google’s chief business officer explains, “Mobile is right now where search was in 1999.”  According to Aurora, Google is connecting consumers to about 15 million calls a month through their advertising platform. That number will grow exponentially as businesses begin to realize the power for mobile pay-per-call.  According to a BIA/Kelsey study last year, on average, U.S. businesses received about 11 calls a month from desktop search and 34.7 calls a month coming from mobile devices. By 2013, those numbers are projected to go to 13.8 and 80.9, respectively. If you are running a company that serves a wide national audience, mobile pay-per-call offers the perfect solution to maximize your reach to prospects.  More active searchers are looking for products or services every day on their smartphones.  The phones are ringing.  Will your company be there? Mike Bek is an Internet marketer and writer with the Mobile Fused Pay-Per-Call Network.