Consumers have long been used to pop-up retailers appearing around specific holidays – the temporary costume shop for Halloween or the kiosks that appear in the mall around Christmas serve as perennial examples. But traditional retailers are turning to this business model as well. Whether retailers are trying to save money on rent or generate consumer interest, this modified form of retailing is quickly expanding.199868_book_mela

A report in the Economist notes that a pop-up retailer may set up shop for only a few days or for an entire season. The report points out that the current financial conditions in many traditional malls makes this strategy viable for retailers.  The exciting part for retailers is that a well-executed pop-up event can generate buzz about brand. The event itself may prompt consumers to spread the news via word of mouth or it could be promoted to select customers via an in-house email blast. Either way, once consumers are convinced they’re getting an opportunity to participate in something new and exciting, the word may spread and both the brand and sales should see a bump.

[Source: Gone tomorrow, Economist, 7.23.09]