Author: Kathy Crosett

Increased Spending on Compliance Means More Agency Opportunity

Since the passage of federal Sarbanes-Oxley legislation several years ago, public companies have been required to meet stringent reporting requirements. With the recent turmoil in the financial markets, it's like that financial firms will increasingly be scrutinized for performance.
This change has increased attention to three key areas:

Planned Increases in Ad Spending Varies by Industry

New reports about cutbacks in 2008 ad spending abound. Not all industries will reduce spending equally. And some industries don't anticipate cutting back spending at all.

Supermarkets Giving Renewed Emphasis to Advertising, Sales Promotions

Due to a variety of economic pressures, food prices have increased over 5% in the last twelve months. Consumers have noticed. For example, studies indicate that the average number of grocery store trips has dropped 3% in the past year and consumers appear to be shopping more at supercenters to save money. While manufacturers have

Face the Pitch

Pitching to prospects can be perceived as one of the most dreaded aspects of being in advertising.

Stress, performance anxiety, a lot of money at stake…these are just a few of the reasons advertisers liken the process to a visit to the dentist’s office. But, PJA Advertising and Marketing president Phil Johnson isn’t sympathetic. In his Advertising Age article, he writes that agencies should "quit whining" about the inevitable pitch, noting that all businesses have unpleasant aspects and require some type of risk.

Increased Popularity of School Choice Programs Means More Advertising

There's no shortage of interest in school-choice across the US. School Choice Yearbook, 2007 indicates that 150,000 students are currently enrolled in these schools. These schools are funded via vouchers or tax credit scholarships. To enroll students, these schools must advertise as they compete with traditional public schools and independent schools.

Help Your Auto Dealerships Promote Leasing

It's no secret that the credit market has tightened. Consumers face problems obtaining financing for mortgages and cars. These financial conditions may explain the growing popularity of long-term loans. The average new-car loan now stands at 64 months, a significant increase from the average 61 month loan in 2003. And some consumers are finding they owe more than the car is worth at the end of the loan period.

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