SALESFUEL TODAY

Musical Training Improves Problem-Solving Skills

by | 3 minute read

The Har­ris Poll reports that the more time one spends in a music pro­gram, the more like­ly they are to say it has been influ­en­tial in con­tribut­ing to their cur­rent lev­el of per­son­al ful­fill­ment. Music edu­ca­tion has the abil­i­ty to pro­vide var­i­ous skills that peo­ple may need for suc­cess in a job or career out­side of music. In fact, over half of those involved in a music pro­gram say music edu­ca­tion was extreme­ly or very impor­tant in pro­vid­ing them with the skills of work­ing towards com­mon goals (54%) and striv­ing for indi­vid­ual excel­lence in a group set­ting (52%), while half (49%) say it pro­vid­ed them with a dis­ci­plined approach to solv­ing prob­lems.

The skills music edu­ca­tion can pro­vide

Music edu­ca­tion can pro­vide more than just learn­ing how to sing and/or play an instru­ment. It also has the abil­i­ty to pro­vide var­i­ous skills that peo­ple may need for suc­cess in a job or career out­side of music. In fact, over half of those involved in a music pro­gram say music edu­ca­tion was extreme­ly or very impor­tant in pro­vid­ing them with the skills of work­ing towards com­mon goals (54%) and striv­ing for indi­vid­ual excel­lence in a group set­ting (52%), while half (49%) say it pro­vid­ed them with a dis­ci­plined approach to solv­ing prob­lems. Almost half of those involved in a music pro­gram say music pro­vid­ed them with the skills of cre­ative prob­lem solv­ing (47%) and flex­i­bil­i­ty in a work sit­u­a­tion (45%). What is inter­est­ing to note is that all of these are up since these ques­tions were pre­vi­ous­ly asked in 2007. Then, 44% said music edu­ca­tion pro­vid­ed them with the skill of work­ing toward com­mon goals and just 36% say it pro­vid­ed them with flex­i­bil­i­ty in work sit­u­a­tions.

Music edu­ca­tion pre­pares peo­ple for life

Among all adults, there is also a sense that music edu­ca­tion is impor­tant. Sev­en in ten Amer­i­cans (71%) say that the learn­ing and habits from music edu­ca­tion equip peo­ple to be bet­ter team play­ers in their careers while two thirds say it pro­vides peo­ple with a dis­ci­plined approach to solv­ing prob­lems (67%) and pre­pares some­one to man­age the tasks of their job more suc­cess­ful­ly (66%). In 2007, two-thirds (66%) said music edu­ca­tion pre­pared peo­ple to be bet­ter team play­ers, while three in five said it pro­vid­ed a dis­ci­plined prob­lem solv­ing approach (61%) and pre­pared peo­ple to man­age tasks more suc­cess­ful­ly (59%).

About 11% of U.S. adults enjoy play­ing a musi­cal instru­ment as a leisure activ­i­ty. Over 50% of these con­sumers have chil­dren liv­ing at home and these chil­dren may be inter­est­ed in sign­ing up for music lessons. In addi­tion, these con­sumers over-index in their intent to pay for lessons in a hob­by in the next year. Mar­keters may want to empha­size the sound of music in their ad cam­paigns and use radio to attract new stu­dents. About 55% of this audi­ence notes that they have tak­en action as the result of an ad they heard on the radio in the past year.

Audi­enceS­CAN data is avail­able as part of a sub­scrip­tion to AdMall for Agen­cies. Media com­pa­nies can access Audi­enceS­CAN data through the Audi­ence Intel­li­gence Reports in AdMall.

Kathy Crosett
Kathy is the Vice Pres­i­dent of Research for Sales­Fu­el. She holds a Mas­ters in Busi­ness Admin­is­tra­tion from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Ver­mont and over­sees a staff of researchers, writ­ers and con­tent providers for Sales­Fu­el. Pre­vi­ous­ly, she was co-owner of sev­er­al small busi­ness­es in the health care ser­vices sec­tor.