Radio Campaigns to Show New Creativity and Reach

by | 2 minute read

Marketers have long known that connecting with consumers through radio works. Radio ad campaigns that reach commuters can often capture the undivided attention of a potential customer who is stuck in traffic. New research  shows that radio works well to influence perspective buyers through all stages of the purchase funnel.

Ipsos OTX MediaCT joined with Katz Marketing Solutions recently to study this topic. The study surveyed people who listened to a set of radio ads and compared their attitudes with people in a control group who had not heard the ads. Significant lift through all stages of the purchase funnel occurred for consumers who listened to the ads:

  • Awareness 10%
  • Familiarity 16%
  • Affinity 39%
  • Purchase/consideration 12%
  • Recommendation 38%

Radio has always been about communicating a lot of information in a short period of time. But that traditional model may be due for a change. Surveyed consumers gave a higher likeability rating to ads that made emotional connections as these statistics that measure creative impact show:

  • Likeable 53%
  • Believable 78%
  • Entertaining 76%
  • Share 60%
  • Talking2Me 67%
  • Informative 61%
  • Informative 63%

As a result of this study, marketers are encouraged to broaden the strategies they use when developing radio ads. Specifically, they should get to the point quickly, talk to rather than at listeners, use normal speaking voices and vary pace and intonation. The industries in this study that benefited from solid radio ad campaigns included movies, financial services, retail, consumer durables and fast food.

[Source: Ipsos Study Shows Radio has Positive Impact at all Stages of Purchase Funnel. Ipsos​-na​.com. 7 Nov. 2011. Web. 1 Dec. 2011]
Kathy Crosett
Kathy is the Vice President of Research for SalesFuel. She holds a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Vermont and oversees a staff of researchers, writers and content providers for SalesFuel. Previously, she was co-owner of several small businesses in the health care services sector.