To Extend Engagement, Apps Push Messages

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For many businesses, the world of mobile marketing starts with rolling out an app. This should be the first step in a long-term plan. Research shows that prompting app users to opt in and targeting them regularly with push messages can generate big results.

Urban Airship, an operator in the push messaging marketplace, has studied app user behavior when marketers engage them with push messaging. After getting consumers to download an app, the next challenge is convincing them to opt-in. Doing so, allows the marketer to retain higher rates of engaged consumers by rolling out push messages.

Whether consumers opt in or not, Urban Airship research shows that 83% will open apps in a high-push engagement. The number drops to 73% in an average-push engagement and to 64% in a low-push engagement. The research also studied consumer behavior over a 4‑month period. In the first month, 68% of opt-in users were retained in a high-push environment. By month 4, 39% of users are still retained. Marketers who do not use push messaging will retain only 39% of opt-in users in month 1 and 19% by month 4.

Scott Kveton, CEO and co-founder, Urban Airship, reminds marketers that push messaging is key to retaining valuable clients. Developing a “best practices approach will achieve optimal results that turn relationships into loyalty.” The company’s release did not specify the number of push messages that qualify for high-push engagement, however; it’s likely that the optimal number will vary by type of marketer, the season and the consumer.  Marketers should be evaluating how they are using their apps and turn up their effort to boost engagement.

[Source: Good Push Messaging Benchmarks. Urban Airship. 8 Nov. 2012. Web. 19 Nov. 2012]
Kathy Crosett
Kathy is the Vice President of Research for SalesFuel. She holds a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Vermont and oversees a staff of researchers, writers and content providers for SalesFuel. Previously, she was co-owner of several small businesses in the health care services sector.