What college students do online differs from teens, according to the Center for Media Design and ExactTarget.  Two in 10 girl high school students (19%) go online to shop, though only 4% search out online deals. However, as college students, 27% of girls specifically search for deals online. 

More than half of all teens and young adults (55%) use the Internet to communicate with friends and family. Girls in high school are twice as likely as girls in college to socialize with online friends (42% vs. 24%). Similarly, 59% of boys in high school say communicating with friends and family online is a primary reason for using the Internet, compared to 28% of male college students.

Boys in high school are significantly more likely than their girl counterparts to use the Internet strictly for research and information (18% vs. 7%).

Four in 10 teens (40%) spend 3-6 hours online each day.  Facebook is their most visited website (41%), followed by Flickr (34%), YouTube (31%), Google (25%), Twitter (25%), and MySpace (21%).

The largest number of teens have two email accounts (41%), while 23% have only one, 21% have three, and 15% have more than four. Nearly eight in 10 (79%) check their email multiple times a day. That said, email is the least likely way they stay in contact with their friends. Text messaging, by far, is their preferred method of communication (51%), followed by meeting in person (29%), via Facebook (25%), and talking on the phone (6%).

Slightly more than half of all teens (55%) have Twitter accounts. Teen girls are slightly more likely than teen boys to have a Twitter account (51% vs. 49%).

Nearly half of teen Internet users (48%) regularly purchase products such as music, books, and clothing online, up from 31% in 2000, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Teens age 14-17 are more likely than those age 12-13 to have made an online purchase (53% vs. 38%). Girls aged 14-17 are also more likely than their boy counterparts to buy things online (57% vs. 48%).

[Source:  “What Teens Do Online,” “Teen Online Purchase Behaviors,” “Changing Habits Among Online Youth.”  Youth Markets Alert/EPM Communications. 1 Aug. 2010.  Web.  5 Aug. 2010.]