According to a recent whitepaper, “The Mall Behind the Spreadsheet,” from AOL Advertising with OTX, women control $4.3 trillion, or approximately 73%, of U.S. household spending while juggling work, home and family life. Many of them manage to shoehorn 27 hours of activities into the standard 24-hour day, as 40% of them shop online during work hours.

Overall, women tend to shop between 15 and 30 minutes a day while at work. Moms, though, tend to shop for longer periods of time at work. 37% say it’s because they have more downtime at work than they do at home.

Women ages 18-34 conduct about half of their online shopping during work hours, and most do so in order to save time.

  • 53% Time saver/convenience
  • 40% To pass time
  • 38% I need it now
  • 20% No time at home
  • 35% Most downtime

Clothing is the number one purchase choice for women online, with books and movies in second place.  Following these categories, women enjoy spending nearly equal amounts on electronics, shoes and travel.

Need is the main driver for women’s online purchases. However, boredom and a compelling call-to-action can inspire younger women to shop.

60% of women respond to email offers, making it the most influential driver of purchase – in fact, 3 out of 4 women subscribe to email alerts.

Women shop Online more at work on Fridays than on any other day of the week, and about half of all women do their shopping between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

On any given day, lunch and other break times provide the best time for women to shop.

  • 54% shop during lunch
  • 41% while multitasking
  • 46% during breaks and downtime
  • 25% right after seeing a “deal”

Retailers can maximize their opportunity to engage online shoppers by:

  • launching their campaigns early in the week to build momentum, following up on Friday when women shop online the most.
  • Using dayparting to target women during lunchtime, their favorite time to make purchases.
  • making registering for email alerts and taking advantage of special deals an easy – even fun – process.
[Source:  “The Mall Behind the Spreadsheet,” AOL Advertising/OTX. 15 Jul. 2010.  Web.  29 Jul. 2010.]