SALESFUEL TODAY

Little Missteps That Cost You Control

by | 2 minute read

Do you feel like you have control during most of your sales conversations? Controlling the discussion is vital to success, and reps may find themselves faltering if they relinquish that control. And, it may happen without the reps even realizing it. Thankfully, you can avoid this scenario by being mindful of certain actions. S. Anthony Iannarino shares 11 ways that a rep can lose control of the sales process, and he explains how best to avoid these slip-ups.

Not knowing you should be in control.

First and foremost, you, the rep, must be aware of the importance of being in control. This awareness is absolutely necessary. “There are some who believe that buyer should, or does, control the process, and that you should be subservient, waiting for them to direct you,” Iannarino writes. That mindset is totally wrong, he believes. Instead of helping, it can only hinder both yours and your client’s successes.

Ending a meeting without the next one scheduled.

Whether it’s over the phone or in-person, you should always leave a meeting with the next one on the calendar. Otherwise, you will be left pursuing the client to talk again.

Avoiding tough next steps.

There may be a next step that you know the client is avoiding. If you avoid it too, you’ve given up control. You’ve got to keep the sales process moving, even if it means the client is stalling.

Letting the client decide what’s next.

Often, a rep will give into a client’s request for a next step, even if that next step isn’t the best choice or the timing is off. Take control by being firm about how to proceed, even if it’s not the easiest path.  

As Iannarino shows, small actions can have big consequences when it comes to controlling the sales conversation. Be the leader of each and every sales process by minding his advice; your clients will thank you in the end!

Jessica Helinski

Jessica Helinski

Jessica is a senior research analyst for SalesFuel focusing on selling to SMB decision makers. She also reports on sales and presentation tips for SalesFuel and Media Sales Today. Jessica is a graduate of Ohio University.