SALESFUEL TODAY

How to Write A Call to Action That Gets Results

by | 2 minute read

Including a call to action in emails can be a very effective way for reps to ensure their emails are productive. But, not every call to action is equal. In fact, some can actually sabotage a deal. HubSpot’s Irina Nica warns salespeople against using weak calls to action in sales emails. “Ask for the right things in the right way, and your relationships with prospects will grow stronger over time,” she writes. “Ask for the wrongs things in the wrong way, and they’ll stall — or even go nowhere at all.”

To make sure your emails aren’t undermining sales, below are a couple calls to action that Nica warns against using:

The Non-Call to Action: “Hope to hear from you soon.”

This closing is polite but it’s also bland. An email’s close presents a great opportunity to inspire the recipient. But, it’s wasted if you don’t encourage him or her to take action. Don’t waste this chance to drive engagement! Instead of a passive close, consider crafting a call to action that is:

  • Posed as a question
  • Thoughtful and simple
  • Hard to say no to
  • Value-backed

A strong statement is much more likely to get a reply than a casual, lax one.

The Jargon-Filled Call to Action: “Would you be available for a 30-minute call so I can show you how our SaaS tool can help you increase LTV by 30% while decreasing CAC by 40%?

Industry jargon and buzzwords may make sense to your peers, but a prospect may be left baffled, overwhelmed, and likely to hit “delete.” Clear, easily understood language is best when communicating with prospects. If you’re not sure if something is too jargon-y, ask yourself if it’s a word or phrase that your best friend or neighbor would know. If not, leave it out.

These are just two of the five calls to action discussed by Nica. Consider her tips the next time you send out an email to a prospect. Not all calls to action will produce results. With her guidance, you can ensure that your sales emails not only inform but also inspire action.

Jessica Helinski

Jessica Helinski

Jessica is a senior research analyst for SalesFuel focusing on selling to SMB decision makers. She also reports on sales and presentation tips for SalesFuel and Media Sales Today. Jessica is a graduate of Ohio University.
Jessica Helinski

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