Even after the prospect has indicated purchase intent, your work is not done, and your ultimate “secret weapon” must still be presented: The sales proposal. This is a vital step in securing the deal, and in a recent Business2Community article, Danny Wong emphasizes the need to carefully craft each proposal – or risk losing the deal. “At the last mile, a well-developed sales proposal can be your secret weapon to securing new business while a generic contract can sabotage all the hard work you have done to date,” he explains.

He shares four ways to write a proposal that will satisfy your customer’s expectations and include important information regarding your product or service. Below are three of the examples:

  • Keep it short and sweet. While it’s important to include the relevant information that the prospect needs, the proposal should not be crammed full of data. It needs to be clear and concise for the prospect’s convenience. After reading it, the prospect should be reminded of why exactly he or she wants to commit and the outcomes he or she should expect.
  • Make it personalized. Every detail should be personalized for the prospect and his or her company – even down to their own jargon. “Each buyer has a specific way of looking at their problem and they understand it from a unique perspective,” he explains. “Make sure your proposal utilizes language that your specific client is familiar with.”
  • Emphasize accuracy, flexibility and honesty. Your sales proposal must include accurate information about specifications and pricing. Also, offer some flexibility in case he or she wants to modify the purchase. All of this will present you as an honest business partner and build even more trust.

The sales proposal is your chance to show your value to the prospect and outline the offer on the table. It also showcases your investment in the prospect and his or her business, providing a solid foundation for a long-lasting relationship.