SALESFUEL TODAY

Don't Let Price Objections Derail the Sale

by | 2 minute read

Price objections aren’t limited to just one industry. No matter what you’re selling, you’ll likely encounter more than one customer who doesn’t agree with your pricing. This is especially true when selling wine, as it can be difficult to convey the value of different wines and their varying prices. The good news, though, is that by questioning costs, the customer is showing interest. As Elizabeth Slater points out in a recent Wine Industry Advisor article, “Many times an objection to the price is the first signal that they really want to buy the product you are selling. If guests were not interested, they would thank you and leave."

Tap into their emotions

It’s now your chance to explain exactly why the customer should buy. Start by illustrating what’s in it for them, emphasizing why certain elements of wines will appeal to the customer. It may take a bit of conversation to get to the customer better, but with the information you gather, you can personalize selections. She also suggests focusing on feelings that the wine can evoke, which will appeal to the emotional side of the brain (the side that tends to make buying decisions).

Show them the value

Next, highlight the wine’s worth, which will reveal the value and subsequent reason for the cost. Slater offers some suggestions for highlighting what impacts a wine’s value:

  • If the grapes are from a well-known vineyard
  • Made by a notable winemaker
  • Small production
  • Customer and reviewer accolades
  • Unique and/or difficult production process

Speaking about the specifics of a wine, and how those details align with the customer’s tastes, will help her consider the purchase from a viewpoint other than the price. As Slater explains, “Selling on price alone is never a good idea. Discover from your guests what makes them want to buy and sell those benefits and features that fit with their wants and needs.”

Jessica Helinski

Jessica Helinski

Jessica is a senior research analyst for SalesFuel focusing on selling to SMB decision makers. She also reports on sales and presentation tips for SalesFuel and Media Sales Today. Jessica is a graduate of Ohio University.