Cardiologists to Target Heart Attack Survivors Who Require Regular Monitoring

cardiologists

"According to a recent online survey conducted by Ipsos on behalf of MDVIP, a national network of primary care doctors who focus on delivering personalized medicine, patient-​centered medicine and preventive care, nearly nine in ten adults say that if they were to experience a heart attack tomorrow, it would make them feel anxious about their future health (89%) and concerned about having another heart attack (88%)."

"Seven in ten say that this would make them feel depressed (71%) and/​or financially strained (69%) and most would likely feel as though they were a heavy burden to their family (63%). Nearly half say that having a sudden heart attack would make them feel isolated (46%), while more than a third would worry about having sex (39%) and having to leave or change their job (34%)

  • Those who have heart disease and/​or have experienced a heart attack/​stroke are significantly more likely to say that they would feel like a burden to their family (76% vs. 62% of those who have never experienced any of these), isolated (65% vs. 44%), and be worried about having sex (50% vs. 37%) or having to leave their job (49% vs. 32%).
  • Men and younger adults (especially those under the age of 35) are also significantly more likely to believe that having a heart attack tomorrow would impact their sex lives and their careers compared to women and those over the age of 55.
  • Anticipating feelings of depression is much more common among those living in the Midwest (81%) compared to those from all other regions."

"Out of a list of five conditions/​diseases, heart attacks rank second most concerning (behind only cancer (62% ranking this a 1 or 2)) with more than half classifying this as among their top two most concerning conditions/​diseases (55%). Roughly three in ten are most likely to be concerned with strokes (33%) or Alzheimer’s disease (28%), while diabetes comes in last with not quite one in four saying that this condition is among their top two most concerning (23%). Heart attacks are especially concerning to middle aged adults (63% of those age 35–54 vs. 47% of those age 18–34 and 53% of those age 55+), non-​Caucasian respondents (65% vs. 51% of Caucasians), and those with a family history of heart disease (63% vs. 49% of those with no family history)."

With so much concern revolving around the potential of heart attacks, Cardiologist Patients are probably on the lookout for insurance companies that spotlight specialized coverage online. According to AudienceSCAN, within the last month, 50.5% of this audience has used a search engine to research a product or service they were considering for purchase and, within the last six months, 26.4% used a mobile device to view a retailer's website.

"One in twenty Americans surveyed say that they have been diagnosed with heart disease (5%), and this is especially common among men (7% vs. 3% of women), older adults (8% of those age 55+ vs. 3% of those age 18–54), Caucasian respondents (6% vs. 0% of non-​Caucasian respondents), and those with a spouse/​partner that has heart disease (22% vs. 2% of those who don’t have a family history/​spouse/​partner with heart disease). Not quite as many report that they have had a heart attack (3%) or stroke (3%) in the past, with heart attacks much more prominent among men (6%) compared to women (1%) and those with a spouse/​partner that has heart disease (15% vs. 2% of those who don’t have a family history/​spouse/​partner with heart disease). On the other hand, most say that they have never been diagnosed with any of these (89%) while 2% don’t know."

"Despite the low occurrence of heart disease/​heart attacks/​strokes, 42% report that they have a family history of heart disease and another one in twenty (5%) say they have a spouse/​partner with the condition. Less than half (47%) say that they neither have a family history of heart disease nor a spouse/​partner with heart disease while one in ten (8%) don’t know.

  • Adults who have been diagnosed with heart disease are significantly more likely to say that they have a family history of the disease (69% vs. 41% of those who have not been diagnosed with heart disease/​heart attack/​stroke). Those with heart disease (23%) and those who have already suffered a heart attack (22%) are also much more likely to say that they have a spouse/​partner with heart disease (vs. 3% of those who have not been diagnosed with heart disease/​heart attack/​stroke)."

Cardiologist Patients can be targeted with heart attack-​focused advertisements through a number of media formats. Last year, according to AudienceSCAN, these consumers took action after receiving direct mail ads (66%), seeing newspaper ads (55.9%) and finding magazine ads (51.9%). They're also 12% more likely than other adults to take action after receiving email ads and 13% more likely to be motivated to action by ads they see on daily deals sites such as Groupon. 

AudienceSCAN data is available for your applications and dashboards through the SalesFuel API. Media companies and agencies can access AudienceSCAN data through the AudienceSCAN Reports in AdMall.

Rachel Cagle

Rachel Cagle

Rachel is a Research Analyst, specializing in audience intelligence, at SalesFuel. She also helps to maintain the major accounts and co-​op intelligence databases. As the holder of a Bachelors degree in English from The Ohio State University, Rachel helps the rest of the SalesFuel team with their writing needs.