Pro Shops to Encourage Exercise for Success in Life

John Rampton writes about the importance of food, sleep, and exercise and how it impacts your success, in Inc​.com. Food has a direct impact on our cognitive performance, which is why one expert says "a poor decision at lunch can derail an entire afternoon."

Get Your Sweat On

"One habit that successful individuals, such as President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Richard Branson, share is exercising daily," Rampton says. Besides keeping off unwanted pounds, exercising daily can help with:

  • Learning the benefits of schedules and goals, along with becoming more disciplined to set schedules and achieve goals.
  • Recharging your brain and breaking bad habits.
  • Making you more competitive.
  • Keeping you mentally sharp.

"Daily exercise also decreases stress, boosts your immune system, keeps you productive, and helps you sleep better at night."

Golf and tennis pro shops can advertise gear and athletic wear that's easy to pack to and from work so professionals can incorporate daily exercise into their routines easily. The AudienceSCAN survey revealed 26.8% of Golf/​Tennis/​Swimming Country Club Members intend to purchase golf clubs or golf apparel in the next 12 months.

"Even if you can't go to the gym for an hour everyday, you can always start taking baby steps. For example, you could start using a standing desk, taking the stairs instead of the escalator or elevator. That doesn't sound like much, but these small actions add-​up and ensure that you stay at your best physically, mentally, and emotionally."

Clubs can encourage members to utilize their facilities daily to keep the mind and body in balance. The AudienceSCAN study found 23.8% of Golf/​Tennis/​Swimming Country Club Members are playing tennis, specifically.

You Are What You Eat

"We've all come across this cliche at some point in our lives. But, when it comes to our productivity, it's actually spot-on."

Writing in the Harvard Business Review, Ron Friedman states, "Food has a direct impact on our cognitive performance, which is why a poor decision at lunch can derail an entire afternoon."

"Just about everything we eat is converted by our body into glucose, which provides the energy our brains need to stay alert," Fredman continues. "When we're running low on glucose, we have a tough time staying focused and our attention drifts. This explains why it's hard to concentrate on an empty stomach."

Certain foods like pasta, bread, cereal and soda, "release their glucose quickly, leading to a burst of energy followed by a slump." High fat meals, however, "(think cheeseburgers and BLTs) provide more sustained energy, but require our digestive system to work harder, reducing oxygen levels in the brain and making us groggy."

"Replace that junk food with options like kale, blueberries, fish, walnuts, and green tea if you want to give your cognitive functions a boost."

Emphasize the need to eat healthy and move more in advertising geared toward swimmers, golfers and tennis-​players. According to AudienceSCAN research, 45.2% of Golf/​Tennis/​Swimming Country Club Members took action after reading newspaper ads in the past month.

Get a Good Night's Sleep

The Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, reminds us just how essential a good night's sleep is. "Lack of sleep exacts a toll on perception and judgment. In the workplace, its effects can be seen in reduced efficiency and productivity, errors, and accidents. Sometimes the effects can even be deadly, as in the case of drowsy driving fatalities."

"Here's the interesting thing. While sleep is important, it doesn't have to be eight hours. In fact, only 27% of highly successful people sleep between 7–8 hours. Another 27% get 6–7 hours."

AudienceSCAN data is available as part of a subscription to AdMall for Agencies, or with the SalesFuel API. Media companies can access AudienceSCAN data through the AudienceSCAN Reports in AdMall.

Courtney Huckabay
Courtney is the Editor for SalesFuel Today. She analyzes secondary customer research and our primary AudienceSCAN research. Courtney is a graduate of Middle Tennessee State University.