Tag: health care

Doctors to Promote Diabetes Screenings to Minority Groups

Being overweight or obese is commonly associated with diabetes, but a new Kaiser Permanente study finds the connection differs widely by race or ethnicity. Members of racial and ethnic minority groups were much more likely to have diabetes or prediabetes at lower weights, even at normal or below-normal body mass index (BMI), according to research published in Diabetes Care.

Health Care Marketers Moving Ad Budgets From TV to Digital

There’s money to be made in health care advertising: $36 billion to be exact. That global figure comes from Zenith Media’s Health Care Advertising Expenditure Forecasts.

Mental Health Professionals to Promote Depression-Treatment Services for Teens

"Depression has become increasingly common among American teenagers — especially teen girls, who are now almost three times as likely as teen boys to have had recent experiences with depression, reports Pew Research Center."

Retailers to Promote Poison Ivy Remedies

"If you’re itching for a summer adventure, a trip to the beach or a hike in the park might be just what you need. But watch where you step; poison ivy could be near. We typically think of this plant as lying deep in the woods, but in fact it’s most commonly found in less remote areas: the edges of your backyard, the shoulder of a highway, even a sand dune on a beach, says Consumer Reports."

Doctors to Promote Whole-Patient Services

"More than eight in 10 adults who have visited a healthcare provider (e.g., doctor's office, hospital, outpatient clinic, urgent care clinic, etc.) at least twice in the past year agree that if their provider knew more about their health interests, goals and motivations, they would be able to serve them better (84% strongly agree/agree/somewhat agree), reports Ipsos."

Millennials and Gen Z Driving Demand for Non-Traditional Health Care

"Unsatisfied with health care’s status quo, millennial and Gen Z consumers in the U.S. are paving the way for non-traditional care models, such as retail clinics, virtual and digital services, according to results of an Accenture survey."

Cardiologists to Target Heart Attack Survivors Who Require Regular Monitoring

"According to a recent online survey conducted by Ipsos on behalf of MDVIP, a national network of primary care doctors who focus on delivering personalized medicine, patient-centered medicine and preventive care, nearly nine in ten adults say that if they were to experience a heart attack tomorrow, it would make them feel anxious about their future health (89%) and concerned about having another heart attack (88%)."

35% of Retirees Don’t Know What Their Vision and Dental Insurance Options Are

If you're retired or getting ready to be, odds are you're unsure how you're going to get vision insurance. That's according to a recent survey commissioned by VSP Vision Care. A combined total of 332 retirees and pre-retirees participated in the survey.

Online Health Care Ads Drive Consumer Action

We’ve all been there: accessing the internet to figure out whether that rash is from a tick bite or poison ivy. Consumers’ increasing use of online resources to access medical information is an opportunity for your clients.

53% of Women Under 55 had Their Heart Attack Symptoms Misread

"Doctors may be more likely to dismiss heart attack symptoms as not heart-related in women younger than age 55, according to a study published online Feb. 20, 2018, by Circulation. This may be the case because women often report other symptoms in addition to chest pain, said the study's authors."

12 Health Care Trends Expected for 2016

"As the nation’s health system continues to move from fee-for-service to a value-based model, community pharmacy will continue to move steadily from just a dispenser of prescriptions to more of a retail health care model, with a growing focus on pharmacy service and a growing reliance on the front-end of the store to drive profitability."

Many Americans Want to Manage Their Health Care via Digital Device

Many Americans are eager to use their mobile phones and tablet computers to better manage their health care, a new poll finds. In addition to using smartphones or tablets to ask their doctors questions, make appointments or get medical test results, consumers may eventually be able to use mobile phones and tablets for actual health-care services — such as monitoring blood pressure or blood sugar, or even getting a diagnosis.

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